OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
OFPD Field Training

Wyatt Williams from Oregon Department of Forestry shows a group of OFPD participants insect galleries on samples of ash bark at a field training.

Photo Credit: Amy Grotta

Emerald Ash Borer

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is metallic green and about 1/2-inch long. EAB larvae kill ash trees by feeding under the bark and disrupting the transport of nutrients and water.

Photo Credit: Daniel Herms

Don't Move Firewood

Buy local firewood and help prevent the spread of the emerald ash borer and Asian longhorned beetle.

Impact of emerald ash borer

Emerald ash borer killed these ash trees in Toledo Ohio in just three years. Lets keep EAB out of Oregon.

Photo credit: Daniel Herms

Asian Longhorned Beetle

More than 130,000 hardwood trees in the United States have been lost to the Asian longhorned beetle.

Photo Credit: USDA

Asian Longhorned Beetle Exit Holes

Asian longhorned beetle exit holes are about 1/4-inch (slightly smaller than a dime) and perfectly round.

Photo credit: USDA

Native Oregon Ash

Oregon ash (Fraxinus latifolia) is at risk if emerald ash borer is introduced to our state.

Photo credit: Tom Brandt

Hands On Experience

OFPD participants evaluate an ash tree with potential emerald ash borer infestation signs and symptoms.

Photo Credit: Amy Grotta

Home Page

Who Are The Oregon Forest Pest Detectors?

Oregon Forest Pest Detectors (OFPDs) are volunteers that help prevent the damaging impacts of invasive forest pests by monitoring for and reporting potential infestations. They usually already have some baseline knowledge of tree/insect identification and are likely to encounter an infestation as part of their work. Forest Pest Detectors could be: arborists, foresters, and landscape contractors; cargo distribution center employees; neighborhood tree volunteers; state park and campground personnel; OSU Extension volunteers; watershed council members; and others in the restoration community. The OFPD program currently focuses on detection of the emerald ash borer (EAB) and Asian longhorn beetle (ALB); future trainings will include additional pests of concern, such as the Asian gypsy moth (AGM).


Why become an OFPD? 

First detections of invasive species are most often made by ordinary citizens who happen to notice something peculiar while on the job in an outdoor setting, or even just doing yardwork at home. This means that OFPDs are very important in early detection and rapid response of control efforts. Watch the video below to learn more:

 


How do I become an OFPD? 

The Oregon Forest Pest Detectors Program offers a comprehensive training designed to prepare volunteers to be Detectors.  The training includes a short online course, followed by a half-day field based workshop. You must complete the online training before attending the field workshop. Continuing education credits are available for some organizations. Visit the Program Information page to learn more.

News

Slow Process of Countering EAB

This NY Times article regales the slow and steady effort by scientists to protect ash trees from EAB. Ash trees produce a certain set of defense compounds in response to attack; the amount and type of these compounds varies by species. Scientists are hard at work developing methods to give North American ash trees the boost of defense compounds that they need to fight EAB.

EAB Webinar Series

Are you interested in learning more about EAB and other invasive forest pests? This website offers opportunities to learn more about invasive insect history and biology, how different US states are handling infestations, new management strategies, and current research.

Nasa Tech Helps Fight Forest Pests

NASA is applying the use of a hyperspectral and thermal imager to detect trees with health issues from the air. 

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