OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

The Pests

The Oregon Forest Pest Detector program focuses on two forest pests: the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis; EAB) and Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis; ALB). They are both exotic wood boring insects that pose a threat to urban and natural forests in Oregon. EAB attacks only ash trees, including the native Oregon Ash (Fraxinus latifolia). ALB preys on maple, elm, horsechestnut, willow, and most other hardwoods except oak.

The chart below is a quick reference guide to basic information about EAB and ALB.

Emerald ash borer and Asian longhorned beetle

Identification, Look-Alikes, and Signs/Symptoms

Adult Beetle Identification:  
“EAB” David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org
David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org
“ALB” NatureServe Flickr.com License CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
NatureServe, Flickr.com License CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Adult EAB are typically bright metalic green and very small (1/4 inch long). Adult ALB are 1 to 1 ½ inch long, shiny black with well defined white spots.
 Larvae Identification: 
“EAB larva” David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org
David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org
“ALB larva” Pest and Disease Image Library, Bugwood.org
Pest and Disease Image Library, Bugwood.org
EAB Larvae ALB Larvae
Look Alikes:  
“Cypriacis langii” Gary L. Parsons, Michigan State University, EAB Identification Guide
Oregon Department of Agriculture
Whitespotted sawyer” Natasha Wright, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Bugwood.org “Bronze Birch Borer” Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org “Oregon fir sawyer” Elizabeth White, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood,org
Oregon Department of Agriculture
EAB can be confused with the bronze birch borer (left) and metallic wood borers like the golden buprestid (middle) and Lang's buprestid (right). ALB can be confused with the banded alder borer (left) and the Oregon fir sawyer female (middle) and male (right).
Signs and Symptoms of Infestation:  
“EAB exit hole” Kenneth R. Law, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org
Kenneth R. Law, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org
“ALB exit hole” Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
EAB create D-shaped exit holes ALB exit holes are the size of a dime and about 2-3 inches deep.
“EAB galleries” Edward Czerwinski, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Bugwood.org “EAB split bark” Joseph O’Brien, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Edward Czerwinski, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources; Joseph O’Brien, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
“ALB egg sites” Joe Boggs, Ohio State University, Bugwood.org “ALB tunnels” E. Richard Hoebeke, Cornell University, Bugwood.org
Joe Boggs, Ohio State University; E. Richard Hoebeke, Cornell University, Bugwood.org
S-shapted galleries and split bark Tunnels and egg sites
“EAB canopy dieback” Joseph O’Brien, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Joseph O’Brien, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
“ALB canopy dieback” Dennis Haugen, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Dennis Haugen, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Crown die back and epicormic shoots Crown die back and broken branches
EAB woodpecker damage” Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
“ALB Frass” Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org
Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org
Woodpecker damage Frass